Python程序员进阶必备工具书:《Python.Cookbook.3rd》(高清.书签.英文完整版)

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Python Cookbook 3rd.pdf author : Alex Martelli、Anna Martelli Ravenscrof和David Ascher 程序员必备进阶书籍 本书不是入门书籍,适合具备一定经验的Python程序员观看
HIRD EDITION Python Cookbook David Beazley and brian k Jones ORE|LLY° Beijing Cambridge. Farnham. KoIn. Sebastopol Tokyo Python Cookbook, Third Edition by David Beazley and brian K Jones Copyright o 2013 David Beazley and Brian Jones. All rights reserved Printed in the United States of america Published by o reilly media, InC, 1005 Gravenstein Highway North, Sebastopol, CA95472 O Reilly books may be purchased for educational, business, or sales promotional use Online editions are alsoavailableformosttitles(http://my.safaribooksonline.com).fOrmoreinformationcontactourcorporate institutionalsalesdepartment:800-998-9938orcorporate@oreilly.com Editors: Meghan Blanchette and Rachel Roumelioti Indexer: WordCo Indexing Services Production Editor: Kristen Borg Cover Designer: Karen Montgomery Copyeditor: Jasmine Kwityn Interior Designer: David Futato Proofreader: BIM Proofreading Services strator: robert romano May 201 Third edition Revision History for the Third Edition: 2013-05-08 First release Seehttp://oreilly.com/catalog/errata.csp?isbn=9781449340377forreleasedetails Nutshell Handbook, the Nutshell Handbook logo, and the O Reilly logo are registered trademarks ofO Reilly Media, Inc. Python Cookbook, the image of a springhaas, and related trade dress are trademarks of o reilly Media inc Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and O Reilly Media, Inc, was aware of a trade mark claim, the designations have been printed in caps or initial caps While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this book, the publisher and authors assume no responsibility for errors or omissions, or for damages resulting from the use of the information contained herein ISBN:978-1-449-34037-7 Table of contents Preface 1. Data Structures and algorithms 1.1. Unpacking a Sequence into Separate variables 1. 2. Unpacking Elements from Iterables of Arbitrary Length 1.3. Keeping the Last n Items 1.4. Finding the largest or smallest N Items 113578 1.5. Implementing a Priority Queue 1.6. Mapping Keys to multiple values in a dictionary 11 1.7. Keeping Dictionaries in Order 1.8. Calculating with Dictionaries 1.9. Finding Commonalities in Two Dictionaries 1.10. Removing Duplicates from a Sequence while Maintaining Order 23578 1. 11. Naming a Slice 1. 12. Determining the most frequently Occurring Items in a Sequence 20 1. 13. Sorting a List of Dictionaries by a Common Key 21 1.14. Sorting Objects Without Native Comparison Support 23 1. 15. Grouping Records Together Based on a Field 24 1. 16. Filtering Sequence Elements 2 1. 17. Extracting a Subset of a Dictionary 28 1. 18. Mapping Names to Sequence Elements 29 1. 19. Transforming and Reducing Data at the Same Time 32 1.20. Combining Multiple Mappings into a Single Mapping 33 2. Strings and Text........... 37 2.1. Splitting Strings on Any of Multiple delimiters 37 2. 2. Matching Text at the Start or End of a String 38 2.3. Matching Strings Using Shell Wildcard Patterns 2.4. Matching and Searching for Text Patterns 42 2.5. Searching and Replacing 45 2.6. Searching and Replacing Case-Insensitive Text 2.7. Specifying a Regular Expression for the Shortest Match 2.8. Writing a Regular Expression for Multiline Patterns 48 2.9. Normalizing Unicode Text to a Standard Representation 50 2. 10. Working with Unicode Characters in Regular Expressions 52 2.11. Stripping Unwanted Characters from Strings 5 2. 12. Sanitizing and cleaning up Text 54 2. 13. Aligning Text Strings 57 2. 14. Combining and Concatenating Strings 58 2.15. Interpolating variables in Strings 61 2. 16. Reformatting Text to a Fixed Number of Columns 2. 17. Handling hTml and XMl Entities in Text 2.18. Tokenizing Text 2. 19. Writing a Simple recursive Descent Parser 2.20. Performing Text Operations on Byte Strings 3. Numbers dates and times. 83 3. 1. Rounding Numerical values 83 3. 2. Performing Accurate Decimal Calculations 84 3.3. Formatting Numbers for Output 87 3.4. Working with Binary, Octal, and Hexadecimal Integers 89 3.5. Packing and Unpacking Large Integers from Bytes 90 3.6. Performing Complex-Valued Math 2 3.7. Working with Infinity and naNs 94 3.8 Calculating with Fractions 96 3.9. Calculating with Large Numerical Arrays 97 3. 10. Performing Matrix and Linear Algebra Calculations 100 3. 11. Picking Things at random 102 3. 12. Converting Days to Seconds, and Other Basic Time Conversions 104 3. 13. Determining last Friday's Date 106 3. 14. Finding the Date Range for the Current Month 107 3. 15. Converting Strings into Datetimes 109 3. 16. Manipulating Dates Involving Time Zones 4. Iterators and generators 113 4.1. Manually Consuming an Iterator 113 4.2. Delegating iteration 114 4.3. Creating New Iteration Patterns with Generators 115 4.4. Implementing the Iterator Protocol 117 4.5. Iterating in reverse 4.6. Defining Generator Functions with Extra State 120 Table of contents 4.7. Taking a Slice of an Iterator 122 4.8. Skipping the First Part of an Iterable 123 4.9. Iterating Over All Possible Combinations or Permutations 125 4.10. Iterating Over the Index-Value Pairs of a Sequence 127 4. 11. Iterating Over Multiple Sequences Simultaneously 129 4. 12. Iterating on Items in Separate Containers 131 4. 13. Creating Data Processing pipelines 132 4.14. Flattening a Nested Sequence 135 4.15. Iterating in Sorted Order Over Merged Sorted Iterables 136 4.16. Replacing infinite while loops with an Iterator 138 5. Files and l/o 141 5.1. Readins and writing Text Data 141 5.2. Printing to a File 5.3. Printing with a Different separator or Line ending 5.4. Reading and Writing Binary Data 145 5.6. Performing 1/0 Operations on a String tist 5.5. Writing to a File That doesnt already ex 147 148 5.7. Reading and Writing Compressed Datafiles 149 5.8. Iterating Over Fixed-Sized Records 151 5.9. Reading Binary Data into a Mutable Buffer 152 5. 10. Memory Mapping Binary Files 153 5.11. Manipulating pathnames 156 5.12. Testing for the Existence of a File 157 5. 13. Getting a Directory Listing 158 5. 14. Bypassing Filename Encoding 160 5.15. Printing Bad Filenames 161 5. 16. Adding or Changing the Encoding of an already Open file 163 5. 17. Writing Bytes to a Text File 165 5. 18. Wrapping an Existing File Descriptor As a File object 166 5. 19. Making Temporary Files and Directories 167 5.20. Communicating with Serial Ports 170 5.21. Serializing Python Objects 171 6. Data Encoding and Processing 6. 1. Reading and Writing CSV Data 175 6. 2. Reading and Writing JSON Data 179 6.3 Parsing Simple XMl data 183 6.4. Parsing Huge XML Files Incrementally 186 6.5. Turning a Dictionary into XML 189 6.6. Parsing, Modifying, and Rewriting XML 191 6.7. Parsing XML Documents with Namespaces 193 Table of Contents 6.8. Interacting with a Relational Database 195 6.9. Decoding and Encoding Hexadecimal Digits 197 6.10. Decoding and encoding base 64 199 6. 11. Reading and Writing Binary Arrays of Structures 199 6. 12. Reading Nested and variable-Sized binary structures 203 6. 13. Summarizing Data and Performing Statistics 214 7. Functions 217 7. 1. Writing Functions That Accept any Number of arguments 217 7. 2. Writing Functions That Only Accept Keyword Arguments 219 7.3. Attaching Informational Metadata to Function Arguments 220 7.4. Returning multiple values from a Function 221 7.5. Defining Functions with Default Arguments 222 7.6. Defining Anonymous or Inline Functions 224 7.7. Capturing Variables in Anonymous Functions 225 7.8. Making an N-Argument Callable Work As a Callable with Fewer Arguments 227 7.9. Replacing Single Method Classes with Functions 231 7.10. Carrying Extra State with Callback Functions 232 7. 11. Inlining Callback Function 235 7.12. Accessing Variables Defined Inside a Closure 238 8. Classes and objects..... 243 8. 1. Changing the String representation of instances 243 8. 2. Customizing String Formatting 245 8.3. Making Objects Support the Context- Management Protocol 246 8.4. Saving Memory When Creating a Large Number of Instances 248 8.5. Encapsulating Names in a Class 250 8.6. Creating Managed Attributes 251 8.7. Calling a method on a parent Class 256 8.8. Extending a property in a Subclass 260 8.9. Creating a New Kind of class or Instance Attribute 264 8.10. Using Lazily Computed Properties 267 8. 11. Simplifying the Initialization of Data Structures 270 8. 12. Defining an Interface or Abstract Base Class 274 8.13. Implementing a Data Model or Type System 277 8. 14. Implementing Custom Containers 283 8. 15. Delegating Attribute Access 287 8. 16. Defining More Than One Constructor in a Class 291 8.17. Creating an Instance Without Invoking init 293 8. 18. Extending Classes with Mixins 294 8. 19. Implementing stateful Objects or State Machines 299 ⅵi| Table of contents 8. 20. Calling a Method on an Object Given the Name As a String 305 8.21. Implementing the Visitor Pattern 306 8.22. Implementing the visitor Pattern Without Recursion 311 8.23. Managing Memory in Cyclic Data Structures 317 8. 24. Making Classes Support Comparison Operations 321 8. 25. Creating Cached Instances 323 9. Metaprogramming.……329 9. 1. Putting a Wrapper Around a Function 329 9. 2. Preserving Function Metadata When Writing Decorators 331 9.3. Unwrapping a decorator 333 9.4. Defining a Decorator That Takes Arguments 334 9.5. Defining a Decorator with User Adjustable attributes 336 9.6. Defining a Decorator That Takes an Optional Argument 339 9.7. Enforcing Type Checking on a Function Using a Decorator 341 9.8. Defining Decorators As Part of a Class 345 9.9. Defining Decorators As Classes 347 9.10. Applying decorators to Class and Static Methods 350 9. 11. Writing Decorators That Add Arguments to Wrapped Functions 352 9. 12. Using decorators to Patch Class Definitions 355 9.13. Using a metaclass to Control Instance creation 356 9. 14. Capturing Class Attribute Definition Order 359 9. 15. Defining a Metaclass That Takes Optional arguments 362 9. 16. Enforcing an Argument Signature on *args and**kwargs 364 9. 17. Enforcing Coding Conventions in Classes 367 9. 18. Defining Classes Programmatically 370 9. 19. Initializing Class Members at Definition Time 374 9.20. Implementing Multiple Dispatch with Function Annotations 376 9. 21. Avoiding Repetitive Property Methods 382 9. 22. Defining Context Managers the easy wa 384 .3. Executing Code with Local Side Effects 386 9. 24. Parsing and Analyzing Python Source 388 9. 25. Disassembling Python Byte Code 392 10. Modules and Packages. 397 10.1. Making a Hierarchical Package of Modules 397 10.2. Controlling the import of everything 398 10.3. Importing Package Submodules Using Relative Names 399 10.4. Splitting a module into multiple files 401 10.5. Making Separate Directories of Code Import Under a Common Namespace 404 10.6. Reloading Modules 406 Table of Contents 10.7. Making a Directory or Zip File Runnable As a Main Script 407 0. 8. Reading Datafiles Within a Pa 408 10.9. Adding directories to sys. path 409 10.10. Importing Modules Using a Name Given in a String 411 10.11. Loading Modules from a Remote Machine Using Import Hooks 412 10.12 Patching Modules on Import 428 10.13 Installing Packages Just for Yourself 431 10.14. Creating a New Python Environment 432 10.15 Distributing Packages 433 11. Network and Web Programming. 437 11.1. Interacting with Http Services As a Client 437 11.2. Creating a tCP Server 441 11.3. Creating a UDP Server 445 11.4. Generating a range of IP Addresses from a CIDR Address 447 11.5. Creating a Simple rest-Based Interface 449 11.6. Implementing a Simple Remote Procedure Call with XML- RPC 454 11.7. Communicating Simply Between Interpreters 456 11.8. Implementing remote Procedure calls 458 11.9. Authenticating Clients Simply 461 11.10. Adding Ssl to Network services 464 11.11. Passing a Socket File Descriptor Between Processes 470 11.12. Understanding Event-Driven I/O 475 11.13. Sending and Receiving Large Arrays 481 12.〔 concurrency..,,,,,,,485 12.1. Starting and Stopping Threads 485 12.2. Determining If a Thread Has Started 488 12.3. Communicating Between Threads 491 12.4. Locking Critical Sections 497 12.5. Locking with Deadlock Avoidance 500 12.6. Storing Thread-Specific State 504 12.7. Creating a Thread Pool 505 12.8. Performing Simple Parallel Programming 509 12.9. Dealing with the GIl (and How to Stop Worrying About It 513 12.10. Defining an Actor Task 516 12.11. Implementing Publish/Subscribe Messaging 520 12.12 USing Generators As an Alternative to Threads 524 12.13 Polling Multiple Thread Queues 531 12. 14. Launching a Daemon Process on Unix 534 3. Utility Scripting and System Administration.………539 I Table of Contents

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